Daily Archives: March 18, 2019

As Worldwide Smoking Rates Fall, Africa’s Shoot Up — With Deadly Consequences

Public health experts visit Malawi and Kenya, arguing that Africans must have access to lower-risk alternatives to smoking

LONDON, March 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Smoking tobacco results in the world’s deadliest preventable diseases, ending the lives of half of all smokers prematurely. By the end of the century, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that one billion people will have died from a smoking-related disease.

Globally, smoking rates are decreasing, but in many lower and middle income countries, African nations among them, rates are increasing. WHO data show a steep rise in smoking in many African countries, with many 5-year projected increases at 5% and more.i

Public health experts from UK-based Knowledge∙Action∙Change have this week visited Lilongwe, Malawiii and Nairobi, Kenyaiii to launch No Fire, No Smoke – The Global State of Tobacco Harm Reduction 2018 (GSTHR), a landmark report on the worldwide availability, regulation, and use of lower-risk alternatives to tobacco, such as e-cigarettes (vapes), heat-not-burn devices, and Swedish snus (pasteurized oral tobacco).

A proven public health strategy, harm reduction refers to policies, regulations, and actions that reduce health risks by providing safer forms of hazardous products or encouraging less risky behaviors, rather than simply banning them.

Independent evidence from the UK government’s leading public health body demonstrated recently that vaping is at least 95% safer than smoking tobacco. Yet despite the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) of 2003 citing harm reduction as one of its main tactics, the WHO has been persistently negative about e-cigarettes, has called for their ban or strict regulation, and sees them as a threat, rather than as a public health opportunity.

Partnering with the information dissemination project, Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi, and the newly launched Campaign for Safer Alternatives based in Kenya, the GSTHR report’s publishers presented global findings on tobacco harm reduction, showing that many smokers have switched to safer products and dramatically reduced the risks associated with smoking.

“We need to halt the dramatic rises in smoking rates in Africa which are predicted by WHO,” asserted Professor Gerry Stimson, Director of KnowledgeActionChange and Emeritus Professor at Imperial College London. “Most smokers want to quit smoking, but they find it hard to stop using nicotine. Around the world, millions of lives depend on both consumer and government acceptance of safer alternatives to smoking.”

Chimwemwe Ngoma, Project Manager, Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi and holder of a Global Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarship, declared: “Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi believes that all citizens of Malawi should be informed of the health consequences, addictive nature, and mortal threat posed by tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke. Malawians should be able to make more informed public and personal choices, including having access to safer nicotine products, to enable them to live longer and healthier lives.”

Joseph Magero, Chair of the Campaign for Safer Alternatives and holder of a Global Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarship, noted: “Society’s relationship with tobacco and nicotine is changing due to developments in technology, such as vapes and other safer nicotine products. The Campaign for Safer Alternatives has formally launched this week to ensure more people across East Africa receive accurate information on alternatives to smoking. By arming people with information, we can finally begin to curb the tobacco epidemic.”

The No Fire, No Smoke – Global State of Tobacco Harm Reduction 2018 report and this press release are published by Knowledge∙Action∙Change, a private sector public health agency based in the United Kingdom.

i  The graphic entitled African region – increasing daily tobacco prevalence trends can be downloaded and reproduced with credit to GSTHR at https://gsthr.org/images/charts/chapter2/2.5.jpg
ii March 13-14, 2019, Golden Peacock Hotel, Lilongwe, Malawi. For further information about the event, contact Chimwemwe Ngoma, as above.
iii March 18, 2019, Hilton Garden Inn Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya. For further information about the event, contact Joseph Magero, as above.

As Worldwide Smoking Rates Fall, Africa’s Shoot Up — With Deadly Consequences

Public health experts visit Malawi and Kenya, arguing that Africans must have access to lower-risk alternatives to smoking

LONDON, March 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Smoking tobacco results in the world’s deadliest preventable diseases, ending the lives of half of all smokers prematurely. By the end of the century, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that one billion people will have died from a smoking-related disease.

Globally, smoking rates are decreasing, but in many lower and middle income countries, African nations among them, rates are increasing. WHO data show a steep rise in smoking in many African countries, with many 5-year projected increases at 5% and more.i

Public health experts from UK-based Knowledge∙Action∙Change have this week visited Lilongwe, Malawiii and Nairobi, Kenyaiii to launch No Fire, No Smoke – The Global State of Tobacco Harm Reduction 2018 (GSTHR), a landmark report on the worldwide availability, regulation, and use of lower-risk alternatives to tobacco, such as e-cigarettes (vapes), heat-not-burn devices, and Swedish snus (pasteurized oral tobacco).

A proven public health strategy, harm reduction refers to policies, regulations, and actions that reduce health risks by providing safer forms of hazardous products or encouraging less risky behaviors, rather than simply banning them.

Independent evidence from the UK government’s leading public health body demonstrated recently that vaping is at least 95% safer than smoking tobacco. Yet despite the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) of 2003 citing harm reduction as one of its main tactics, the WHO has been persistently negative about e-cigarettes, has called for their ban or strict regulation, and sees them as a threat, rather than as a public health opportunity.

Partnering with the information dissemination project, Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi, and the newly launched Campaign for Safer Alternatives based in Kenya, the GSTHR report’s publishers presented global findings on tobacco harm reduction, showing that many smokers have switched to safer products and dramatically reduced the risks associated with smoking.

“We need to halt the dramatic rises in smoking rates in Africa which are predicted by WHO,” asserted Professor Gerry Stimson, Director of KnowledgeActionChange and Emeritus Professor at Imperial College London. “Most smokers want to quit smoking, but they find it hard to stop using nicotine. Around the world, millions of lives depend on both consumer and government acceptance of safer alternatives to smoking.”

Chimwemwe Ngoma, Project Manager, Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi and holder of a Global Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarship, declared: “Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi believes that all citizens of Malawi should be informed of the health consequences, addictive nature, and mortal threat posed by tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke. Malawians should be able to make more informed public and personal choices, including having access to safer nicotine products, to enable them to live longer and healthier lives.”

Joseph Magero, Chair of the Campaign for Safer Alternatives and holder of a Global Tobacco Harm Reduction Scholarship, noted: “Society’s relationship with tobacco and nicotine is changing due to developments in technology, such as vapes and other safer nicotine products. The Campaign for Safer Alternatives has formally launched this week to ensure more people across East Africa receive accurate information on alternatives to smoking. By arming people with information, we can finally begin to curb the tobacco epidemic.”

The No Fire, No Smoke – Global State of Tobacco Harm Reduction 2018 report and this press release are published by Knowledge∙Action∙Change, a private sector public health agency based in the United Kingdom.

i  The graphic entitled African region – increasing daily tobacco prevalence trends can be downloaded and reproduced with credit to GSTHR at https://gsthr.org/images/charts/chapter2/2.5.jpg
ii March 13-14, 2019, Golden Peacock Hotel, Lilongwe, Malawi. For further information about the event, contact Chimwemwe Ngoma, as above.
iii March 18, 2019, Hilton Garden Inn Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya. For further information about the event, contact Joseph Magero, as above.

Alors que les taux de tabagisme dans le monde reculent, ceux de l’Afrique grimpent en flèche — avec des conséquences mortelles

Des spécialistes de la santé publique se rendent au Malawi et au Kenya, et demandent que les Africains aient accès à des solutions moins risquées pour remplacer le tabac

LONDRES, 18 de marzo de 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Le tabagisme entraîne les maladies évitables les plus mortelles au monde, qui mettent fin prématurément à la vie de la moitié des fumeurs. À la fin du siècle, l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) estime qu’un milliard de personnes seront mortes d’une maladie liée au tabagisme.

Les taux de tabagisme sont en baisse à l’échelle mondiale, mais dans de nombreux pays à revenu faible ou intermédiaire, parmi lesquels les pays africains, les taux sont en augmentation. Les données de l’OMS montrent une nette augmentation du tabagisme dans de nombreux pays africains, de nombreux pays connaissant une augmentation projetée sur 5 ans de 5 % et plus .i

Les spécialistes de la santé publique Knowledge Action Change , basés au Royaume-Uni, ont visité cette semaine Lilongwe, au Malawiii et Nairobi, au Kenyaiii afin de lancer «  Pas de feu, pas de fumée : situation mondiale de la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme 2018  » (Global State of Tobacco Harm Reduction, GSTHR) , un rapport historique sur la disponibilité, la réglementation et l’utilisation à l’échelle mondiale de solutions de remplacement du tabac présentant un risque moindre, telles que les cigarettes électroniques (vapotage), les produits de tabac à chauffer sans combustion et le snus suédois (tabac oral pasteurisé).

Une stratégie de santé publique ayant fait ses preuves, la réduction des risques fait référence aux politiques, réglementations et actions visant à réduire les risques pour la santé en fournissant des formes plus sûres de produits dangereux ou en encourageant des comportements moins risqués, plutôt que de simplement les interdire.

Des preuves indépendantes émanant du principal organisme de santé publique du gouvernement britannique ont récemment démontré que le vapotage est au moins 95 % moins nocif que le tabac . Pourtant, malgré la Convention-cadre de l’OMS pour la lutte antitabac (CCLAT) de 2003 citant la réduction des risques comme l’une de ses principales tactiques, l’OMS a toujours été négative à propos des cigarettes électroniques, a appelé à leur interdiction ou à une réglementation stricte, et les considère comme une menace, plutôt que comme une opportunité pour la santé publique.

En partenariat avecle projet de diffusion des informations, Réduction des risques liés au tabagisme au Malawi (Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi), et la nouvelle Campagne pour des alternatives plus sûres  (Campaign for Safer Alternatives) basée au Kenya, les éditeurs du rapport GSTHR ont présenté des conclusions à l’échelle mondiale sur la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme, qui montrent que les fumeurs ont opté pour des produits plus sûrs et ont considérablement réduit les risques liés au tabac.

« Nous devons mettre fin à la hausse spectaculaire du taux de tabagisme en Afrique annoncée par l’OMS », a affirmé le professeur Gerry Stimson, directeur de Knowledge Action Change et professeur émérite à l’Imperial College London. « La plupart des fumeurs veulent arrêter de fumer, mais ils ont du mal à arrêter de consommer de la nicotine. Dans le monde entier, des millions de vies dépendent de l’acceptation par le consommateur et les gouvernements d’alternatives plus sûres au tabagisme. »

Chimwemwe Ngoma, chef de projet de la Réduction des risques liés au tabagisme au Malawi et titulaire d’une bourse d’études mondiale sur la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme , a déclaré : « La Réduction des risques liés au tabagisme au Malawi estime que tous les citoyens du Malawi devraient être informés des conséquences sur la santé, du caractère addictif et de la menace mortelle que représentent la consommation de tabac et l’exposition à la fumée du tabac. Les Malawiens devraient pouvoir faire des choix publics et personnels plus éclairés, notamment avoir accès à des produits à base de nicotine plus sûrs, afin de leur permettre de vivre plus longtemps et en meilleure santé. »

Joseph Magero, président de la Campagne pour des alternatives plus sûres et titulaire d’une bourse d’études mondiale sur la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme , a noté : « Les relations de la société avec le tabac et la nicotine sont en train de changer en raison des progrès technologiques, tels que les cigarettes électroniques et les autres produits plus sûrs contenant de la nicotine. La Campagne pour des alternatives plus sûres a été officiellement lancée cette semaine pour veiller à ce que davantage de personnes en Afrique de l’Est reçoivent des informations précises sur les alternatives au tabagisme. En informant les gens, nous pouvons enfin commencer à enrayer l’épidémie de tabac. »

Le rapport « Pas de feu, pas de fumée : situation mondiale de la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme 2018 » et ce communiqué de presse sont publiés par Knowledge ∙ Action ∙ Change , une agence de santé publique du secteur privé basée au Royaume-Uni.

iLe graphique intitulé African region – increasing daily tobacco prevalence trends peut être téléchargé et reproduit en créditant le GSTHR sur https://gsthr.org/images/charts/chapter2/2.5.jpg
ii13-14 mars 2019, Golden Peacock Hotel, Lilongwe, Malawi. Pour plus d’informations sur l’événement, contactez Chimwemwe Ngoma, comme indiqué ci-dessus.
iii18 mars 2019, Hilton Garden Inn Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya. Pour plus d’informations sur l’événement, contactez Joseph Magero, comme indiqué ci-dessus.

Alors que les taux de tabagisme dans le monde reculent, ceux de l’Afrique grimpent en flèche — avec des conséquences mortelles

Des spécialistes de la santé publique se rendent au Malawi et au Kenya, et demandent que les Africains aient accès à des solutions moins risquées pour remplacer le tabac

LONDRES, 18 de marzo de 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Le tabagisme entraîne les maladies évitables les plus mortelles au monde, qui mettent fin prématurément à la vie de la moitié des fumeurs. À la fin du siècle, l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) estime qu’un milliard de personnes seront mortes d’une maladie liée au tabagisme.

Les taux de tabagisme sont en baisse à l’échelle mondiale, mais dans de nombreux pays à revenu faible ou intermédiaire, parmi lesquels les pays africains, les taux sont en augmentation. Les données de l’OMS montrent une nette augmentation du tabagisme dans de nombreux pays africains, de nombreux pays connaissant une augmentation projetée sur 5 ans de 5 % et plus .i

Les spécialistes de la santé publique Knowledge Action Change , basés au Royaume-Uni, ont visité cette semaine Lilongwe, au Malawiii et Nairobi, au Kenyaiii afin de lancer «  Pas de feu, pas de fumée : situation mondiale de la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme 2018  » (Global State of Tobacco Harm Reduction, GSTHR) , un rapport historique sur la disponibilité, la réglementation et l’utilisation à l’échelle mondiale de solutions de remplacement du tabac présentant un risque moindre, telles que les cigarettes électroniques (vapotage), les produits de tabac à chauffer sans combustion et le snus suédois (tabac oral pasteurisé).

Une stratégie de santé publique ayant fait ses preuves, la réduction des risques fait référence aux politiques, réglementations et actions visant à réduire les risques pour la santé en fournissant des formes plus sûres de produits dangereux ou en encourageant des comportements moins risqués, plutôt que de simplement les interdire.

Des preuves indépendantes émanant du principal organisme de santé publique du gouvernement britannique ont récemment démontré que le vapotage est au moins 95 % moins nocif que le tabac . Pourtant, malgré la Convention-cadre de l’OMS pour la lutte antitabac (CCLAT) de 2003 citant la réduction des risques comme l’une de ses principales tactiques, l’OMS a toujours été négative à propos des cigarettes électroniques, a appelé à leur interdiction ou à une réglementation stricte, et les considère comme une menace, plutôt que comme une opportunité pour la santé publique.

En partenariat avecle projet de diffusion des informations, Réduction des risques liés au tabagisme au Malawi (Tobacco Harm Reduction Malawi), et la nouvelle Campagne pour des alternatives plus sûres  (Campaign for Safer Alternatives) basée au Kenya, les éditeurs du rapport GSTHR ont présenté des conclusions à l’échelle mondiale sur la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme, qui montrent que les fumeurs ont opté pour des produits plus sûrs et ont considérablement réduit les risques liés au tabac.

« Nous devons mettre fin à la hausse spectaculaire du taux de tabagisme en Afrique annoncée par l’OMS », a affirmé le professeur Gerry Stimson, directeur de Knowledge Action Change et professeur émérite à l’Imperial College London. « La plupart des fumeurs veulent arrêter de fumer, mais ils ont du mal à arrêter de consommer de la nicotine. Dans le monde entier, des millions de vies dépendent de l’acceptation par le consommateur et les gouvernements d’alternatives plus sûres au tabagisme. »

Chimwemwe Ngoma, chef de projet de la Réduction des risques liés au tabagisme au Malawi et titulaire d’une bourse d’études mondiale sur la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme , a déclaré : « La Réduction des risques liés au tabagisme au Malawi estime que tous les citoyens du Malawi devraient être informés des conséquences sur la santé, du caractère addictif et de la menace mortelle que représentent la consommation de tabac et l’exposition à la fumée du tabac. Les Malawiens devraient pouvoir faire des choix publics et personnels plus éclairés, notamment avoir accès à des produits à base de nicotine plus sûrs, afin de leur permettre de vivre plus longtemps et en meilleure santé. »

Joseph Magero, président de la Campagne pour des alternatives plus sûres et titulaire d’une bourse d’études mondiale sur la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme , a noté : « Les relations de la société avec le tabac et la nicotine sont en train de changer en raison des progrès technologiques, tels que les cigarettes électroniques et les autres produits plus sûrs contenant de la nicotine. La Campagne pour des alternatives plus sûres a été officiellement lancée cette semaine pour veiller à ce que davantage de personnes en Afrique de l’Est reçoivent des informations précises sur les alternatives au tabagisme. En informant les gens, nous pouvons enfin commencer à enrayer l’épidémie de tabac. »

Le rapport « Pas de feu, pas de fumée : situation mondiale de la réduction des risques liés au tabagisme 2018 » et ce communiqué de presse sont publiés par Knowledge ∙ Action ∙ Change , une agence de santé publique du secteur privé basée au Royaume-Uni.

iLe graphique intitulé African region – increasing daily tobacco prevalence trends peut être téléchargé et reproduit en créditant le GSTHR sur https://gsthr.org/images/charts/chapter2/2.5.jpg
ii13-14 mars 2019, Golden Peacock Hotel, Lilongwe, Malawi. Pour plus d’informations sur l’événement, contactez Chimwemwe Ngoma, comme indiqué ci-dessus.
iii18 mars 2019, Hilton Garden Inn Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya. Pour plus d’informations sur l’événement, contactez Joseph Magero, comme indiqué ci-dessus.

Hundreds Protest in Sudan, Keep Pressure on Bashir

KHARTOUM, SUDAN Hundreds of protesters, mostly students, took to the streets in and near Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Monday, continuing a three-month wave of demonstrations that has posed the most serious challenge yet to President Omar al-Bashir’s three-decade rule.

Students, activists and other protesters frustrated with economic hardships have held almost daily demonstrations across Sudan since Dec. 19, calling for Bashir to step down.

Police used tear gas Monday to disperse hundreds of students from Eastern Nile University protesting in Khartoum North, and hundreds of other demonstrators on Sitteen Street, which runs through several upscale neighborhoods, witnesses said.

At least four demonstrators were detained Monday by security forces in Khartoum 2, an upscale area in the heart of the capital where dozens protested, a witness said. Security forces used batons to disperse the demonstrators, some of whom torched car tires.

Dozens more protested on a main street in Khartoum’s Riyadh neighborhood.

Tear gas, live ammo

Police have used tear gas, batons and sometimes live ammunition to break up protests. Officials have confirmed 33 deaths in the unrest since December, but activists say the toll is significantly higher.

Opposition organizers often give the protests a theme for the day � Monday’s were for “student martyrs.” Demonstrations on Sunday, which drew thousands in and near Khartoum, were for “graduates and the unemployed.”

Bashir, who took power in a military coup in 1989, promised during a swearing-in ceremony for a new cabinet last week that he would engage in dialogue with the opposition. The opposition has rejected dialogue with Bashir and has continued to call for him and his government to step aside.

Last month Bashir declared a state of emergency, dissolved the central government, replaced state governors with security officials, expanded police powers and banned unlicensed public gatherings.

That has not stopped the protesters, who have stepped up demonstrations in recent days.

Source: Voice of America