AFRICA SUSTAINABLE LIVESTOCK 2050 PROJECT LAUNCHED IN ADDIS

ADDIS ABABA, The Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 project which aims to facilitate dialogue, knowledge-sharing and consultation among livestock, health and environment stakeholders was launched here Thursday.

The project has the objective of identifying opportunities and threats associated with the long-term development of livestock and to seek agreement on priority reforms and investments to create the capacity needed to ensure sustainable development of the sector in the next three or four decades.

The two-year project is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and will be implemented in six countries — Ethiopia, Kenya, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Nigeria and Uganda.

The Sub Regional Co0ordinator for Eastern Africa of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Patrick Kormawa, said at the launching that as the demand for animal-sourced food is expected to grow significantly, Africa would need to undertake policy and institutional reforms to ensure that the opportunities generated by the growing market translates into benefits.

It is estimated that by 2050, the meat market will reach 34.8 million tones and the milk market is projected at 82.6 million tonnes, an increase of 145 and 155 per cent respectively, Kormawa said.

Over this period, Africa’s volume of meat to be consumed will be on parallel with that of the developed world and that of Latin America, with only South and South East Asia anticipated to have higher growth, according to him.

This is challenging because of the heterogeneity and complexity of the livestock sector and, in particular, because of the negative effects that the livestock sector can have on society, through zoonotic diseases; contaminated animal source foods; pollution of soil, water and air; and loss of biodiversity, he elaborated.

As the project is a complex project which looks beyond current policies and programmes, it requires inputs from multiple sectors, a one-health approach that utilizes expertise from multiple disciplines, he indicated.

Ethiopia’s Minister of Livestock and Fisheries Resources, Professor Fekadu Beyene, said that the project is in line with the country’s livestock master plan, which sets out investment interventions for the sustainability and development of the sector.

Ethiopia’s Livestock Master Plan sets out interventions in better genetics, feed and health services to improve productivity, and production in the key livestock value chains, he added.

“We are looking forward to partnering with USAID and FAO to examine our livestock systems now, and realize the potential they have for the future through the sustainable implementation of the Livestock Master Plan.”

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

AFRICA SUSTAINABLE LIVESTOCK 2050 PROJECT LAUNCHED IN ADDIS

ADDIS ABABA, The Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050 project which aims to facilitate dialogue, knowledge-sharing and consultation among livestock, health and environment stakeholders was launched here Thursday.

The project has the objective of identifying opportunities and threats associated with the long-term development of livestock and to seek agreement on priority reforms and investments to create the capacity needed to ensure sustainable development of the sector in the next three or four decades.

The two-year project is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and will be implemented in six countries — Ethiopia, Kenya, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Nigeria and Uganda.

The Sub Regional Co0ordinator for Eastern Africa of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Patrick Kormawa, said at the launching that as the demand for animal-sourced food is expected to grow significantly, Africa would need to undertake policy and institutional reforms to ensure that the opportunities generated by the growing market translates into benefits.

It is estimated that by 2050, the meat market will reach 34.8 million tones and the milk market is projected at 82.6 million tonnes, an increase of 145 and 155 per cent respectively, Kormawa said.

Over this period, Africa’s volume of meat to be consumed will be on parallel with that of the developed world and that of Latin America, with only South and South East Asia anticipated to have higher growth, according to him.

This is challenging because of the heterogeneity and complexity of the livestock sector and, in particular, because of the negative effects that the livestock sector can have on society, through zoonotic diseases; contaminated animal source foods; pollution of soil, water and air; and loss of biodiversity, he elaborated.

As the project is a complex project which looks beyond current policies and programmes, it requires inputs from multiple sectors, a one-health approach that utilizes expertise from multiple disciplines, he indicated.

Ethiopia’s Minister of Livestock and Fisheries Resources, Professor Fekadu Beyene, said that the project is in line with the country’s livestock master plan, which sets out investment interventions for the sustainability and development of the sector.

Ethiopia’s Livestock Master Plan sets out interventions in better genetics, feed and health services to improve productivity, and production in the key livestock value chains, he added.

“We are looking forward to partnering with USAID and FAO to examine our livestock systems now, and realize the potential they have for the future through the sustainable implementation of the Livestock Master Plan.”

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK