Climate services vital for improving climate risk management

Lilongwe: Climate services such as the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) Adaptation Program in Africa (APA) have been described as a vital component with the potential to improving risk management.

The programme which is in the second phase has an immediate implication in disaster risk reduction, improved livelihood, health and improved quality of people’s lives.

Speaking during the launch of GFCS APA in Lilongwe on Thursday, Ministry of Natural Resources, Energy and Mining Chief Director, Bright Kumwembe said the initiative is a positive step in addressing climate change issues which can bring transformation and positive impact to people’s lives.

However, Kumwembe said the efforts can only be realized if there are collaborative efforts among the stakeholders.

For the transformation to happen, we need collaboration among various stakeholders and support of the government to ensure that climate services implementation is given the needed attention within the country’s efforts, he said.

Despite the first phase of the program sowing seeds for collaboration, Kumwembe said more needs to be done in order to ensure the much needed cooperation for the development and access to reliable and tailored climate services.

He said such collaborative efforts will in turn support communities plan better thereby sustaining their livelihoods.

Kumwembe said issues of climate change are very challenging and as such it is important that the country adapts to such issues.

For purposes of continuous survival it is always important that we recognise that climate change is real and that we have to adapt to so this program is one of those that is helping people in the country to stand up to issues of climate change, he said.

He hailed the first phase of the program saying it has done well in provision of climate information in terms of services to all the partners that need such services.

He said what is needed for people is to appreciate that issues of climate change cannot be predetermined and as such they should always be attentive to information that is being shared.

Norwegian Embassy First Secretary responsible for Agriculture and Environment, Jan Erik Studsred concurred with Kumwembe saying collaboration is vital in delivering climate services.

He said it is important for Malawi to act on knowledge that has been generated through the program.

The most important thing for Malawi is that it needs to enable different organisations to work together and act on knowledge that has been generated, he said.

He appealed to government to recognise that climate is changing and policies need to be addressed to respond to those challenges citing the agriculture sector which needs to have a more diversified system.

The APA Phase II, which runs from 2018 2019, is a project funded by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) and will build on accomplishments of Phase I which ran from 2014 2017.

It aims to increase resilience of people most vulnerable to the impacts of weather and climate related hazards by developing user driven climate services for food security, health and disaster risk reduction in Malawi and Tanzania.

Source: Malawi News Agency MANA

Climate services vital for improving climate risk management

Lilongwe: Climate services such as the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) Adaptation Program in Africa (APA) have been described as a vital component with the potential to improving risk management.

The programme which is in the second phase has an immediate implication in disaster risk reduction, improved livelihood, health and improved quality of people’s lives.

Speaking during the launch of GFCS APA in Lilongwe on Thursday, Ministry of Natural Resources, Energy and Mining Chief Director, Bright Kumwembe said the initiative is a positive step in addressing climate change issues which can bring transformation and positive impact to people’s lives.

However, Kumwembe said the efforts can only be realized if there are collaborative efforts among the stakeholders.

For the transformation to happen, we need collaboration among various stakeholders and support of the government to ensure that climate services implementation is given the needed attention within the country’s efforts, he said.

Despite the first phase of the program sowing seeds for collaboration, Kumwembe said more needs to be done in order to ensure the much needed cooperation for the development and access to reliable and tailored climate services.

He said such collaborative efforts will in turn support communities plan better thereby sustaining their livelihoods.

Kumwembe said issues of climate change are very challenging and as such it is important that the country adapts to such issues.

For purposes of continuous survival it is always important that we recognise that climate change is real and that we have to adapt to so this program is one of those that is helping people in the country to stand up to issues of climate change, he said.

He hailed the first phase of the program saying it has done well in provision of climate information in terms of services to all the partners that need such services.

He said what is needed for people is to appreciate that issues of climate change cannot be predetermined and as such they should always be attentive to information that is being shared.

Norwegian Embassy First Secretary responsible for Agriculture and Environment, Jan Erik Studsred concurred with Kumwembe saying collaboration is vital in delivering climate services.

He said it is important for Malawi to act on knowledge that has been generated through the program.

The most important thing for Malawi is that it needs to enable different organisations to work together and act on knowledge that has been generated, he said.

He appealed to government to recognise that climate is changing and policies need to be addressed to respond to those challenges citing the agriculture sector which needs to have a more diversified system.

The APA Phase II, which runs from 2018 2019, is a project funded by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD) and will build on accomplishments of Phase I which ran from 2014 2017.

It aims to increase resilience of people most vulnerable to the impacts of weather and climate related hazards by developing user driven climate services for food security, health and disaster risk reduction in Malawi and Tanzania.

Source: Malawi News Agency MANA