The postal sector is still vibrant-CRASA

Lilongwe, Communications Regulators Association of Southern Africa (CRASA) on Monday assured its member states to continue investing in the postal sector because there are technological advancements that are fostering the growth of the sector.

Head of Postal Services at CRASA, Brian Mwansa said the postal sector is able to reinvent itself and it is resilient to focus on segments of the market that are growing.

He, however, acknowledged the decline in the number of people that send letters through postal services. In spite of that, he said the number of people sending parcels is on the increase as they are able to order goods online and the reliable means of delivery is through the postal sector.

Mwansa was speaking during the official opening of the CRASA committee meetings in Lilongwe.

The infrastructural growth of the postal sector is what is making it resilient to changing times because post offices are numerous, he said.

Since the postal service is susceptible to abuse by criminals if not properly monitored, Mwansa said they (CRASA) have also developed security and integrity guidelines in addition to those for quality service delivery.

Consumers are interested in their parcels being delivered on time, if not on time but within a specified time of promise, he said.

The guidelines, according to Mwansa, equip member states with a measuring guide to assess quality being delivered to the public and take remedial action to postal operators that are licensed when they fail to meet the target provided.

The CRASA official cited another development in the postal sector in the Southern African region, the postal strategy, which is an output of the postal committee. He said the strategy gives direction in which the postal sector should take.

The strategy has grown to ministerial level of the SADC member states for them to approve it so that it can permeate all the structures and be implemented at national level accordingly, he said.

Malawi Communications Regulatory Authority (MACRA)’s Director General, Godfrey Itaye advised representatives from different member states to take the committee meetings seriously so that they can provide technical advice and assistance to CRASA, which will ensure effective implementation of the region’s agenda.

To committees that are meeting, my advice will be to ask you to take your time to carefully discuss the issues on the table to allow the next CRASA annual general meeting have a good platform to make decisions for the region, he said.

We are all aware of the supremacy of the AGM as a decision-making institution of CRASA and it is, therefore, imperative for CRASA member states to dedicate their efforts in the implementation of action items pertinent to the cause of CRASA, he added.

Currently, CRASA has thirteen active members and these are ICT and postal regulators. CRASA’s objective is to harmonize the postal, and information and communications technologies regulatory environment in the SADC region.

Source: Malawi News Agency

The postal sector is still vibrant-CRASA

Lilongwe, Communications Regulators Association of Southern Africa (CRASA) on Monday assured its member states to continue investing in the postal sector because there are technological advancements that are fostering the growth of the sector.

Head of Postal Services at CRASA, Brian Mwansa said the postal sector is able to reinvent itself and it is resilient to focus on segments of the market that are growing.

He, however, acknowledged the decline in the number of people that send letters through postal services. In spite of that, he said the number of people sending parcels is on the increase as they are able to order goods online and the reliable means of delivery is through the postal sector.

Mwansa was speaking during the official opening of the CRASA committee meetings in Lilongwe.

The infrastructural growth of the postal sector is what is making it resilient to changing times because post offices are numerous, he said.

Since the postal service is susceptible to abuse by criminals if not properly monitored, Mwansa said they (CRASA) have also developed security and integrity guidelines in addition to those for quality service delivery.

Consumers are interested in their parcels being delivered on time, if not on time but within a specified time of promise, he said.

The guidelines, according to Mwansa, equip member states with a measuring guide to assess quality being delivered to the public and take remedial action to postal operators that are licensed when they fail to meet the target provided.

The CRASA official cited another development in the postal sector in the Southern African region, the postal strategy, which is an output of the postal committee. He said the strategy gives direction in which the postal sector should take.

The strategy has grown to ministerial level of the SADC member states for them to approve it so that it can permeate all the structures and be implemented at national level accordingly, he said.

Malawi Communications Regulatory Authority (MACRA)’s Director General, Godfrey Itaye advised representatives from different member states to take the committee meetings seriously so that they can provide technical advice and assistance to CRASA, which will ensure effective implementation of the region’s agenda.

To committees that are meeting, my advice will be to ask you to take your time to carefully discuss the issues on the table to allow the next CRASA annual general meeting have a good platform to make decisions for the region, he said.

We are all aware of the supremacy of the AGM as a decision-making institution of CRASA and it is, therefore, imperative for CRASA member states to dedicate their efforts in the implementation of action items pertinent to the cause of CRASA, he added.

Currently, CRASA has thirteen active members and these are ICT and postal regulators. CRASA’s objective is to harmonize the postal, and information and communications technologies regulatory environment in the SADC region.

Source: Malawi News Agency